Betrayal linguistics, sociology, historiology and philosophy

The wrong assessments of ancient Near East also betray historians, sociologists and philosophers.

Philosophy and conceptual religion did not begin with the foundation of the Greek philosophy or the raising of the Chinese or Indic religion, around the sixth century before Christ.

There are archaeological evidences for philosophy and conceptual religion in ancient Near East from at least 7000 before Christ in Kurdish.

 

One of the premier sociologists, the America Robert Bellah in a recent book, “Religion in Human Evolution” tries to identify when religion emerged and how it changed through the centuries.

He ends with the Axial Age of the sixth century before Christ, focusing on ancient India, Israel, Greece and China.

Bellah identifies three stages: enactive, symbolic and conceptual. Basic rituals are part of the first, then myth and legend, and finally ethical and theological reasoning. The conceptual stage is one related to the Axial Age, roughly around the sixth century BC, when Plato and other thinkers founded Greek philosophy and the Buddha and other teachers raised Indic religion to a whole new conceptual level, according to Bellah.

 

From a Kurdish perspective in the book Bible Discovered, I made it clear that the modern sociology and philosophy are based on wrong assessments concern the early culture, history and ethnography of the mankind.

The very notion of the Axial, conceptual stage did not begin with the foundation of the Greek philosophy or the raising of the Chinese or Indic religion, around the sixth century before Christ.

The world’s most influential philosophies were founded at least 7000 before Christ in the ancient Near East in Kurdish language. The Axial symbols (Coptic Cross  and  Maltese Cross ) in the sense of “religious profession and act, mass, mission” occur on ancient Kurdish care bowls and dishes from 4000 BC; see the cover of Bible Discovered and pg. 104-105; also see under the well-known ancient Near East terms Din-ger-ki, Din-ker-ki, Ul-maš-ki.

The ancient Near East cuneiform sign (maš) means “act, mass, mission”.

The ancient Near East axis, axial, cuneiform sign (dinger, dinker) means “religious profession, cardinal; lawmaker”; from the root din “religion” and ger, ker “create, creator”. So din-ker is the origin of the word car-din-al “religious profession”.

These also make assured that the contemporary assumption – the origins of religious profession date from the time when Christians were recognized in the Church as followers after perfection in the practice of religious life, – is not real and should be corrected in: “the origins of religious profession date from the holy ancient Kurdish time when believers were recognized in the Kerk (Church) as followers after perfection in the practice of social life”, since religion was law and morality”.

 

April 3, 2012

Hamíit Qliji Bérai

Published by

Hamiit Qliji Berai

Hamíit Qliji Bérai is Hamid Ghelichi, born on July 26, 1960, in Béra, Ilam province, Eastern Kurdsán. That is the archaeological site Béra.xáni “Béra dukedom” (the Farsi Badreh). Hamíit studied independently multidisciplinary social sciences from 1979-1990, when the universities were closed in Iran for four years from 1979 -1983, because of islamization of the education system. From 1990, he has been of Dutch (Netherlands) nationality, a citizen of The Hague. Since 1994, Hamíit Qliji Bérai has dedicated his whole time to independently researching ancient Near East from the earliest human civilization "ancient Near East archaeology, cultural stratigraphy, language, philosophy, ethnography and the Bible". Hamíit Qliji Bérai is an independent full time researcher who since 1994 continuously researching archaeological sources for early culture, history and ethnography of the mankind in ancient Near East, all over the world in different universities including the University of Leiden Netherlands 1994-2003, the University of Oxford 2004-2005, the University of Cambridge 2006-2007, the University of Chicago 2007-2009, British Museum, London University and the British Library in London 2010-2012. He takes a different approach, a multidisciplinary scientific approach from the perspective Kurdish oral traditions consist of myriad languages, literature, names etc. of the sites where the ancient sources come from. His research has led to an adequate understanding of the ancient sources, which shows the world of the ancient Near East in a completely different way than some know it to be now. Books authored by H Q Bérai: http://www.elamirkan.net/